Adventures / Eat

The quintessential checklist for a quick rendezvous in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

January 5, 2018

Fort Lauderdale

Fort Lauderdale

Ocean and Oak

Two best friends, a Florida native and a first-timer, five full days, and a list of must-do’s:

Crush Coronas and people watch at the iconic Elbow Room

Eat brunch at The Floridian on Las Olas Boulevard

Check out the daily catch on Commercial Pier

Scope out surfboards and gear at BC Surf and Sport

Pack a picnic and spend the day at the beach and in the sea

Catch a buzz at Fat Cats

Eat late night pizza at Primanti Brothers

Watch the sunrise from the sand with fresh brewed coffee in hand

It was a short week filled with a lot of laughs, gorgeous weather, a crystal clear ocean, and unbounded bliss.

Writing by Jenn Parker

Photos by Kaitlyn Shea

 

Adventures / Canada / products / stuff we love

Crucial Gear for Fall on Vancouver Island

November 13, 2017

Fall is our favourite time to be on Vancouver Island. The waves pump, the crowds thin out and the weather isn’t totally unbearable. We all know the question; imagine you were deserted on a remote island, what items could you not live without? We have put together our top twelve items for fall on this Island.

  1. Aftanas Sled Round Tail Surfboard—This is my go to board for Vancouver Island; actually this is my go to board for everywhere now. The shaper is a Tofino local and knows the waves really well, and his boards are made for the conditions here.
  2. Filson Dry Bag—This bag has been a lifesaver for me. It keeps my camera dry, as well as anything else that is inside. It’s perfect for the rainy weather on the island.
  3. Billabong Towel Poncho—We do a lot of undressing and dressing in beach parking lots. With this poncho, changing in and out of your wetsuit is easy peasey. Last fall Jenn swore she wouldn’t spend another fall on the island without one.
  4. Arc’teryx Gortex Rain Shell—This jacket will keep you bone dry, which will keep you happy. It rains a lot on this part of the island (it’s a rainforest after all), and there is nothing worse than being soggy and cold.
  5. Hunter Rain Boots—Most rain boots are sloppy and hard to walk in. These ones are slim and comfortable for dog walking and surf checking. They also come in an array of super cute colors, which is also very important.
  6. Patagonia Fleece—The trick to staying dry and warm here is strategic layering. This fleece is the perfect under-the-raincoat layer or outer layer, if it isn’t raining. Patagonia gear is high on our list because they promote sustainability and also back up their products with a lifetime guarantee.
  7. Stanley Thermos—Yes, this thermos is growler size and can be filled with beer at the local Tofino Brewery, which is perfect for post surf beers on the beach. It keeps liquids cold for 24 hours and hot for 18 hours, so it can also be filled with tea or whatever other liquid your heart desires.
  8. Salvaje Bikini—Didn’t think you would need a bikini on this chilly island? Guess again. You’ll need one for the post surf hot tub. These bikinis are just our ultimate favourites. Use promo code OCEANANDOAKF&F online for a deal.
  9. Billabong 5/4 Synergy Wetsuit—The water starts to cool down in September and October, so a hooded suit is preferable for those who value coziness. We like Billabong because of the flexibility and comfort; some 5/4’s can be very restricting and hard to paddle in.
  10. Xcel Wetsuit Gloves—As the temperatures drop and the fall swell fills in, gloves become a necessity. We like these ones because they aren’t cumbersome as some others can be.
  11. Xcel Wetsuit Boots—These boots have fleece lining and are super cozy.
  12. Lightspeed Outdoors Waterproof Beach Blanket—This beach blanket is another key item to staying dry. Perfect to sit on for the post surf beer.

If you are coming to Vancouver Island during the fall, we hope this guide will help you out a bit. Stay warm, dry, and happy on the island!

 

Adventures / surf / travel

Vida Baja en VidaSoul

July 18, 2017

VidaSoul Hotel East Cape

VidaSoul Hotel East Cape

VidaSoul Hotel East Cape

VidaSoul Hotel East Cape

VidaSoul Hotel East Cape

VidaSoul Hotel

VidaSoul Hotel East Cape

VidaSoul Hotel East Cape

VidaSoul Hotel East Cape

VidaSoul Hotel East Cape

VidaSoul Hotel East Cape

VidaSoul Hotel East Cape

VidaSoul Hotel East Cape

VidaSoul Hotel East Cape

VidaSoul Hotel East Cape

It had been four months since our last Mexican beer together; four months too long. I traveled north and Kaitlyn traveled south to reunite on the East Cape of Baja in the middle of the desert and the Sea of Cortez. The adventure began in a cube shaped rental car and a drive at dusk down a lonely desert road that was fringed with cacti, the sporadic cluster of skinny cows, and the random landmarks that we were told to look for in order to find our way. The harsh landscape inspired a feeling of lawlessness. It was time for that first Mexican beer. It became apparent upon initial observation that only the determined can survive here, and there is something inherently beautiful about that.

As the arid mountains devoured the last light, we turned left at our final landmark and shortly thereafter we pulled into VidaSoul, a beacon of life in an otherwise seemingly deserted human oasis of private homes. We walked into the bar to find tequila happy guests dancing their last song and a group of determined cows quenching their own thirst in the pool. Our bedroom overlooked the swell saturated sea and gratefully satiated desert souls that depend on the fresh water pool. The cows returned everyday. VidaSoul is an architectural marvel and luxurious haven in what felt like the middle of nowhere. We dropped off our board bags in our room, and then we found our own tequila happiness.

Sleep came easy and fast in our king-sized Tempur-Pedic bed with soft white linens and the lullaby of the Sea of Cortez drawn out into the balmy night. The eager anticipation of waves woke us up before daybreak though. By the time we had finished our first cup of coffee, we had already made friends with a group of surfers from San Diego who were heading out for their last surf. We tagged along and found the wave that we would surf for the entirety of our time on the East Cape. One was even so kind as to let me use his brand new board since mine had sustained some damage during transportation. He helped me to repair it though in time for our sunset surf.

He became part of our tribe for the next three days since he was staying longer than his friends. We met and befriended an inspiring collection of gypsy souls, adventurers, professional campers, cross continental drifters, and free spirited surfers who found what we had soon discovered about life in the desert by the sea. It was like everyone was meant to be there in that exact moment in time. Everyone whom we met possessed the same positivity, minimalist philosophy, and citizen of the world vibe. We became part of something before we even knew that it existed.

Our timing was impeccable. The waves superseded our wildest expectations. We were surfing overhead to double overhead flowy rights that peeled from a coral reef that was teeming with parrotfish and sergeant majors to an inside reef covered in sea urchins. If you caught the right wave in the right place, the dance between you and the sea lasted for hundreds of meters. It didn’t always line up though, which spaced out the thin crowd even more and gave everyone the chance to catch ample waves. Everyone in the water seemed to share the ideology that the waves belonged to no one and everyone. This is how it is supposed to be.

We refueled and recounted our waves over fish tacos for lunch and the most exquisite veggie pasta and margaritas every night for dinner. Antonio and Juan took exceptional care of us from dawn until after dusk. Antonio had a sweet stoic face and the gentlest demeanor. He looked at us like we were his daughters. He reminded us of an old boat captain that we had had a few years ago on a surf trip to Ollie’s Point; determined and sage-like. Juan wore a permanent smile on his face and made sure that we had everything we needed. They were our desert guardians.

It became impossible not to wonder how such a place as VidaSoul came to be all the way out here. How was construction and operation even possible with nothing but sand roads and not even so much as a small food store anywhere nearby? There hadn’t even been any measurable rain in the last six years. Then we met Joan. Joan is the owner of VidaSoul and her son is the visionary architect. While we didn’t have enough time with her to get the complete detailed story, we found out that the initial days of VidaSoul were quite eerie and only possible through impressive determination.

 

It was the middle of August in 2004. I was working out here alone and it was 100 degrees at night, so I had to sleep outside in a hammock. In those years, we didn’t have any storage so the boxes of beer were outside and the burros would come and eat the cardboard. On that night, I cleaned up the kitchen and then went outside to relax in my hammock. It was so hot that I couldn’t sleep. I returned to the kitchen for a snack and realized that the freezer had defrosted and it had fish juice coming out of it. I had to clean it up, but afterward realized that I was covered in the stinky smell of fish. The offensive and potent smell was everywhere. There was no escaping it.

I returned to my hammock and now I couldn’t sleep because I was covered in fish juice. However, I eventually drifted off, but the sleep didn’t last long. I woke up to a very startling sound. I could hear beer bottle rattling and then I saw the burros running away. This was quite curious to me, so I got my flashlight and walked around my camper. I encountered an animal  that was as dark as night standing next to my generator. I shined the light on it, but it didn’t as much as move a hair.

I ran the light down its body and discovered that it had a long tail like a lion. It still never even flinched. I just stood there ten feet away trying to decide what one should do in this type of situation. I slowly backed away from the large cat. Eventually, it slowly sauntered off into the night, but as it did it would occasionally glance back and my light would catch its yellow demon-like eyes glaring back toward me. I finally returned to my hammock. Even though I reeked of fish and might seem like a tempting feast for the wild cat, it was just too hot to go inside of the camper. I then realized that the initial noise that woke me was actually the roaring cry of the cat. It was terrifying.

In the following years, I saw this same cat or a relative of this animal walking up my fence line and then jumping over into the neighbor’s yard on a prowl for a meal or just a drink of water. There was one that even came inside of the building that is now the restaurant before we were occupied and had any doors. The smell of fish must have been initially too inviting to resist, but I am still here to tell the tale.

 

We ended up having to seek refuge on the Pacific coast near Todos Santos from a two day wind storm. It was strange being back in civilization. We surfed a sketchy and sharky feeling point break that was far bigger than it appeared from the shore. The water was cold and a single local was out who told us that we picked a hell of a day to paddle out. We drank warm beers on the beach to warm up after a heart-pounding exit through a heavy and seething backwash shore break as the sun was setting. The call of the East Cape was too strong though and we returned as soon as the wind broke.

Our tribe had dispersed and it was just the two of us now. Our final days at VidaSoul were blissful and every moment, past and present, honored great gratitude. Our journey came to a close as were we driving for one final last surf check. We encountered a lone desert burro walking up the road. We got out of our car and he walked right up to us. His sweetness was the embodiment of this place. He seemed to have relished in the encounter as much as we did. We had our final words and loving contact, and then he turned and walked back into the desert as we turned and left the desert.

Huge Thanks to VidaSoul Hotel for having us

Bikinis & Shorts by  Salvaje Swimwear—use our promo code for 15% off OCEANANDOAKF&F

Writing by Jenn Parker

Photos by Kaitlyn Shea

Photo 10 by Deb Crowell

Photo 11 by Nathan Weldon

 

 

Adventures / travel

Maui and all it’s wonder

May 4, 2017

costa rica photographer

photographer costa rica

costa rica photographer

costa rica photographer

costa rica photographer

costa rica photographer

costa rica photographer

costa rica photographer

costa rica photographer

costa rica photographer

costa rica photographer

costa rica photographer

costa rica photographer

I have been to Maui many times and every time I go back, there is a certain sense of newness. The island itself is incredible with its fields of lava, crystal clear turquoise water, the monstrously huge crator, and hidden waterfalls seemingly everywhere. The feeling of Maui, its spirit, is just as beautiful as the landscape. My mom always says, “If you want to see life with clarity, Maui is the place that it will happen for you”.

We spend our days cruising around the island while stopping to admire each and every view. We take pictures and swims. We race to catch sunsets, laze around on the beach to catch rays, sample new types of poke, and carry around several bikinis in our bags at all times so that we always have a dry one to put on. Life on Maui is pretty simple, and we don’t resist it’s perfect simplicity.

Photos & writing by: Kaitlyn Shea

Clothing (in order of appearance): Wilfred, Eau Paix Vie, Billabong

surf

Staying Injury Free in 2017

January 6, 2017

It took me a while to admit to myself that the pain I was having in my right shoulder was not going to go away on it’s own. The self dialogue of “I am just a little sore—it’s probably nothing—it’s not that bad—etcetera—etcetera” is probably somewhat familiar to most of us who use of bodies for athletic purposes. When we start ignoring our body’s warning signals such as persistent soreness and unexplainable fatigue, we unintentially set the stage for more serious problems like reoccurring injuries and longterm or chronic pain. So how can we enjoy our activities and use of bodies effectively without getting injured? These are some of the things we have learned along the way.

Hydration

I went to see an acupuncturist for my inured shoulder and when she asked how much water I drink daily, I exclaimed “Oh, I drink A TON of water, that’s not a problem for me”. She told me that my 2 litres per day was not adequate because of my coffee consumption (2 coffees a day) & occasional post-surf brews (both actually dehydrate your body). Hydration is one of the most important factors when it comes to staying injury free because water lubricates our joints, muscles and inhibits inflammation. Dehydration can contribute to muscle injury and our bodies need water to repair and recover. I now aim for 3+ litres per day.

Rest Days

This is a tough one for me, especially when it comes to surfing. If the conditions are good, I get in the water everyday. Prior to my shoulder injury, I was surfing every single day for 2 hours or more. I didn’t realize that this can cause injuries until I was told by my massage therapist. Our bodies need rest to repair our muscles after working them and without this opportunity, repetitive strain can occur. I have been taking a rest day once a week and my shoulder has noticeably improved.

Self Care

No matter what activities we do, our bodies require maintenance. Massage therapy, acupuncture, stretching, and physio therapy are highly beneficial to almost anyone who works out, does an extreme sport or spends a lot of time sitting at a desk. It’s great to try out different techniques and different practitioners to see what works for you.

Listening to your Body

Our bodies are pretty good at telling us something isn’t right, however many of us are guilty of ignoring these indicators and “pushing through”. Ignoring pain signals can increase the seriousness of an existing injury or cause a new one. When something doesn’t feel right, seek help and deal with it right away. Health professionals are our friends and often they have seen our problems before and have a course of action to help you get better.

Writing by: Kaitlyn Shea

Photos 2,3,4: Kaitlyn Shea

Photo 5: Carive Productions

Adventures / surf

Surf and Rain Showers in Panama

December 20, 2016

There has been but few cessations in the rain in the past twenty-four hours. The weather bands cloak Isla Cebaco before extending their long and dripping hands landward to take hold of the Queen’s beach. In a place like this, all you can do is embrace the holdfast.

The thunder here sounds like the shaking of rusted sheet metal. The air smells of wet dogs, jasmine, and stagnant water. The river is swollen and saturated with driftwood and detritus; it consumes the shallow seas to the west, south, and east. The beach is littered with single shoes, plastic, and cobs of baby corn. There is little movement on the streets; only stray dogs seeking shelter and sympathy. The air and our attitudes are wet with indecision.

This is now. Here is then.

We crossed the peninsula Thursday afternoon after several meaty beach break surfs in Playa Venao and a right point break session to ourselves off the untamed coast of Playa Cambutal. I had my first experience with homemade hojaladres (Panamanian fried dough) in Cambutal as we waited for the right tide. Leon walked to the tienda and bought four eggs for eighty cents and asked the woman at the fonda (equivalent to a soda in Costa Rica or a small, typically family owned and operated restaurant that serves homemade traditional dishes) to cook them for the three of us. We sat in the backyard of a house on a river and ate. Three women were already prepping for lunch at nine o’clock in the morning. The perfume of onions and cilantro wafted through the yard.

The road led us through rivers, past pastures, into bare boned towns, and in peripheral view of the sunset as we arrived in Mariato. We ate rice, lentils, and fried chicken with pineapple and lime chicha (a sugary homemade juice mixed with water) at a fonda with painted gourds hanging from the rafters. We were asleep by 7:30.

Entering the water here felt septic. My hands completely disappeared with each stroke forward. Tiny twigs and decomposing plant matter filled my bikini and tangled into my hair. I spit and flushed my nose after each duck dive. The water felt lifeless and the waves took on a tidal bore-like texture. The sea seemed void of salt. After one set wave, one overhead, open, top to bottom hackable wave, I noticed nothing displeasing.

When your days are heavily centered around the tides and you are staying in a town with no name, the common cure for antsyness is taking unnecessary risks. We decided to try and drive down to the river mouth via the patch soft sand, dry tributary indentations, and driftwood and rock piling topography that separated the shore from the parallel riverbed. Rental car, four-wheel drive, and finger counting the tide, a risk on the mind cancels time.

The river mouth session had the makings of a dirty dream. What looked like nothing turned out to be a peeling perfectly sculpted left point break. It was a rare period of time where I had absolutely nothing on my mind…until a large reptile caught my peripheral eye, then I had crocodiles on my mind as I made the long paddle back to the take-off spot alone. In that seemingly lifeless shoreline, I think the sea turtle appreciated our company.

That was the last surf before the great storm. The sky unzipped with such force that I’m afraid that the zipper might have broken, as all of my zippers seem to do somehow. We drank beers, ate soup, watched Jaws with subpar Internet from a hammock, and still felt no relief from the overbearing weight of October. With the certain uncertainty of the season comes the opportunity to practice patience. We are but bystanders in the wake of natural forces that are beyond our control. We did have a car though.

There’s a frustrating and inexplicable art of decision making in a triad of indecisives. However, the morning monsoon graced us with a decisive decision. We drove north to head west to end south in Santa Catalina with pessimistic weather and optimistic minds. The sky can’t cry forever. The wind will eventually tire of blowing onshore. And, when it’s least expected that one wave will start the show. Until then, we sit and stare at the sea.

Written by Jenn Parker

Photos by Jenn Parker

Costa Rica

Rainy Season Observations

October 20, 2016

photographer in tofino

tamarindo photographer

tamarindo-photographer-life

Tamarindo Photographer

Tamarindo Photographer

Tamarindo Photographer

 

If it’s not dry, then it is wet. However, for the past five years, Guanacaste has experienced an earth parched “non rainy rainy season” following the six seasonally dry months each year. All felt the effects of such minuscule rain. The monkeys, horses, and stray dogs, amongst many others, relied on a few noble individuals who shared their precious water with them. Everyone was thirsty and hot, and dusty. The Great Drought expanded far past this little province in Costa Rica. It seemed like the mouth of the world went dry.

On April 25, swollen clouds burst their seams. The first rain is always celebrated here. People walk out into the middle of the streets in jubilation. An echo of, “it’s raining!” and “is that rain?” rings through the town in disbelief until it touches the skin of the disbelievers. Old molasses from the roads collects in potholes and diffuses merriment. Dust turns to mud, single sandals fall victim to inconspicuous sink holes, and the back of all legs look paint brush splattered, but these things  aren’t as  bad as the rain is good.

It’s a season of abundance. The cows and horses have plump girths and babies at their sides. Low lying foliage is taller than I am and serves as a hidden highway for small mammals and reptiles. I have counted fifteen geckos on my tiny patio feasting on moths and mosquitos. Dragonflies occupy the day thermals, while fireflies light up the dark spaces of the night. Graceful crocodiles swim parallel to the beaches out of what appears to be for sheer pleasure.

I find that the violent storms bring peace to the mind. The smell before, during, and after a rain is like a time released sedative. We all need to slow down sometimes. It is an excuse to just be.

Walking on the beach at sunset during this season is borderline transcendental. A thin layer of ocean slicks the sand and the ever transforming and intensifying palate of colors in the clouds reflect underneath your toes. It is a feeling of being grounded here with your head in the heavens. The sunset show encompasses you like a warm embrace. You can’t help but offer a standing ovation for the performance, which is beautifully different every night.

I miss the rains when they are gone, but I’ve also learned to love fully what you have when you have it. Life is like the seasons, a cyclical series of predictable un-predictableness’s. Like a rainbow, it is here and gone with the start and end points having no indelible significance. One day soon, and quite suddenly and unexpectedly, the offshore winds will start and will manifest the next transformation. I like that one too though because while I know what to expect in some ways, I have no idea what to expect in others.

Writing  & photos 2,3,5 by Jenn Parker

Photos 1,4,6 by Kaitlyn Shea

 

 

Canada

Reflecting on Summer in Canada

September 27, 2016

photographer in Tofino

photographer in Tofino

photographer in Tofino

photographer in Tofino

photographer in Tofino

photographer in Tofino

photographer in Tofino

photographer in Tofino

photographer in Tofino

There is something innately special about summer in Canada. This is the first summer in quite a long time that I stayed in Canada for the entirety of the summer season (OK OK I did sneak off to Hawaii for a week in June).  I think the reason summer is so special here is because the other months of the year hold such seriousness, we experience harsh elements, giant storms, and very short daylight hours.  So when summer peaks her head around the corner after that last big rain or heavy snowfall, we as Canadians, rejoice whole heartedly. Winter jackets get put in the closet and are forgotten about, sandals come out and toes get sandy. Wetsuit gloves are replaced with neon nail polish and our mood shifts into free spiritedness and gratitude. Canadian summer officially ended 3 days ago, the air feels more crisp each morning and the sun goes down a little bit earlier each evening. As I reflect on summer 2016, I am met with feelings of thankfulness—it really could not have been better.

Writing and Photos by: Kaitlyn Shea

Clothing (in order of appearance): Billabong, Wildfox Couture, Billabong & Moana

 

 

stuff we love

Our Top Ten Favourite Beauty Products

June 25, 2016

We decided that it’s about time we share a few of our favourite potions! Living by the beach and constantly spending time in the sun can damage skin and make your hair a nightmare. Like when you forget a hair tie and come out of the water with one giant dreadlock (this is a weekly occurrence for me). Or your sunscreen washes off after 10 minutes and your face gets fried to lobster status. These products are our go-to and will hopefully help you stay fresh faced and bushy tailed!

  1. La Roche Posay Sunscreen (broad spectrum, water resistant 80 mins)—This is my absolute favourite sunscreen! I can walk the dog in the morning, reapply, surf in the afternoon and my face does not get burnt. I try to avoid getting a tanned face and seriously, this stuff does the trick! It stays on really well in the water and the best part is that it doesn’t make my face dry like some sunscreens do. It can also be used on your face and body so you don’t have to carry around two different sunscreen bottles.
  2. Colorescience Sunforgettable Loose Mineral Sunscreen Brush—Jenn introduced me to this mineral sunscreen brush and now I cannot live without it. It is perfect for running around town or sunset drinks on the beach when you still want to be wearing SPF but you also want to look natural and not shiny faced. You just brush it on your face, neck & chest and you are protected,bronzed & glowy!
  3. Kiehl’s Ultra Face Cleanser—In Costa Rica we wear a TON of sunscreen and sometimes reapply multiple times throughout the day. This cleanser is great for taking it all off. It is gentle but it works! I like that it is scentless and doesn’t irritate my skin at all.
  4. Kiehl’s Midnight Recovery Concentrate—I recently started using this on my face at night and in my opinion, it beats every night cream I have tried. After a day in the sun, my face needs moisture and this concentrate works wonders. Even during the time of year when AC is necessary for a good night’s sleep, you will wake up with a dewy glow.
  5. Revlon ONE Coconut Conditioner—Now for the hair! My hair is hard to manage. It’s thick and dry and becomes even more so when I’m in the ocean and sun. This leave-in conditioner is a life saver. For those of you with long hair, you know how horrific it can be combing out your hair after a beach day or surf session. This product makes it easy. Plus it smells like a dream!
  6. Moroccan Oil—This is my other secret weapon. A few drops of this (combined with the coconut conditioner) and my hair stays smooth and shiny.
  7. NARS Laguna Bronzer—Since I try to keep my face white to avoid sun damage, I like using a little bronzer for a colour boost. Some bronzers are muddy or orange, not this one! You will look like a perfectly tanned goddess without the sun damage.
  8. NARS The Multiple Stick—I use this stick for blush & highlighting my cheeks but it can also be used for lips & eyes. Application using this stick is fool proof which is great for me since I have zero patience when it comes to makeup. The colour I use is Orgasm which is great for blush and just shiny enough to notice but not overly.
  9. Great Lash Waterproof Mascara by Maybelline—This mascara is so awesome that I have never even tried to use any other. It stays on in the water, comes off in the shower and isn’t clumpy.
  10. Kiehl’s Coconut Lip Balm—This stuff smells delicious and has a bit of SPF which is what I want. It also isn’t sticky and really keeps lips soft and moisturized.

Writing by Kaitlyn Shea

fashion

What We’ve Been Wearing

May 31, 2016

photographer tofino

photographer tofino

photographer in Tofino

photographer Tofino

photographer Tofino

photographer tofino

photographer Tofino photographer Tofino

photographer Tofino

photographer Tofino

photographer in Tofino

photographer Tofino

Bikinis. If we had to pick something we wear the most in Costa Rica, bikinis would be it. Fortunately for us, there are a a handful of great bikini boutiques in town and also a few favourite online boutiques that keep us coming back for more. When it comes to clothes, light fabrics are preferred and we lean towards cotton, linen and flowy silhouettes. We like shopping local and supporting the shops in our little beach town as much as possible (links to our faves are below).

Bikinis by Stonefox Swim & Morena

Other Items from Mermaids & Sailors, GirlFish, and, Wilfred

Photos & Writing by Kaitlyn Shea

Photos 3 & 9 by Jenn Parker